romans

Thumbnail image for Exodus 33:19 in its Old Testament Context

Exodus 33:19 in its Old Testament Context

6 August 2009 Reviews

In this chapter, Piper attempts to venture back to the book of Exodus which Paul quotes in Romans 9:15: “I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion.” The goal for Piper is to show that even in its original context (whether or not Paul might have tampered with that context is another issue entirely) this is a general principle rather than a particular event. By this, I mean to say that the notion of God having mercy/compassion on whom he will have mercy/compassion is not just relevant to Moses at that moment, but is an attribute of God that we can all take to the bank for all time.

0 comments Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for The Purpose that Accords with Election: Romans 9:6–13

The Purpose that Accords with Election: Romans 9:6–13

29 July 2009 Reviews

In the third chapter of The Justification of God, Piper does just this: he re-iterates much of what he has said before, makes his point, deals with dissenters, and moves on to address those dissenters. The evidence that he marshals is impressive in terms of breadth. He is comfortable talking about modern scholars, ancient exegetes, apocryphal literature, and exclusivist sects (i.e., the Qumran community).

3 comments Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for My Kinsmen are Accursed!

My Kinsmen are Accursed!

22 July 2009 Reviews

This is the second part of a fairly extensive review of John Piper’s The Justification of God: An Exegetical and Theological Study of Romans 9:1-23. In the second chapter of The Justification of God, Piper’s aim is to show what is at stake in Romans 9–11: “[I]t appears that what God has guaranteed is in […]

0 comments Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Introduction

Introduction

22 July 2009 Reviews

This is the first part of a fairly extensive review of John Piper’s The Justification of God: An Exegetical and Theological Study of Romans 9:1-23. Piper uses just a few page to introduce his work as a whole. This chapter provides the major questions and gives a road map for the argument. I shall do […]

0 comments Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for ΧΡΙΣΤΟΥ ΙΗΣΟΥ — Romans 1:1 (Part 4)

ΧΡΙΣΤΟΥ ΙΗΣΟΥ — Romans 1:1 (Part 4)

2 March 2009 Biblical Studies

When last we looked at Romans 1:1, we saw that Paul presents himself immediately as a “slave” (δοῦλος). We explored that confounding Bob Dylan idea: “you gotta serve somebody.” In the words of the frog-throated cultural prophet: “it may be the devil, or it may be the Lord…but we all gotta serve somebody.” Here, Paul is telling us who he serves: Christ Jesus.

0 comments Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Romans 1:1 (Part 3)

Romans 1:1 (Part 3)

15 June 2007 Biblical Studies

ΔΟΥΛΟΣ — “slave” The first two words of Romans are: ΠΑΥΛΟΣ ΔΟΥΛΟΣ—”Paul slave”. Today, we often consider Romans to be the Magna Carta of the Christian faith because it is the closest we get to a system of theology from a New Testament work. If we are going to take this seriously, then let’s seriously […]

2 comments Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Romans 1:1 (Part 2)

Romans 1:1 (Part 2)

16 April 2007 Biblical Studies

ΠΑΥΛΟΣ The first word of Romans is “Paul.” It can be so easy to gloss over this name and think nothing of it. After all, we all know who Paul is, right? This idea that Paul is someone that we “get”—someone that we know—is increasingly being challenged. In recent years, Paul has received a great […]

3 comments Read the full article →
Thumbnail image for Introduction — Romans 1:1 (Part 1)

Introduction — Romans 1:1 (Part 1)

13 April 2007 Biblical Studies

ΠΑΥΛΟΣ ΔΟΥΛΟΣ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΥ ΙΗΣΟΥ ΚΛΗΤΟΣ ΑΠΟΣΤΟΛΟΣ ΑΦΩΡΙΣΜΕΝΟΣ ΕΙΣ ΕΥΑΓΓΕΛΙΟΝ ΘΕΟΥ An Italian philosopher named Giorgio Agamben wrote an interesting book called The Time That Remains. In this particular work, Agamben focuses on each word in Romans 1:1, believing that it holds the key to the interpretation of Romans. After reading the works of Barth and […]

1 comment Read the full article →